MusicWeb international (5-2015)
"...This newer recording with the Bard sisters on the Capriccio label is superb, with gorgeous atmosphere in the slow movement or section, as the music runs continuously. Everything is technically under control in the swift outer movements, which doesn’t mean we are lacking in effusive abandon. (...) With its attractive programme and the excellent musicianship of these performers this Capriccio disc is a real treat and very easy to recommend. With a delightful touch and plenty of drama and excitement this is by no means an offering of just fluffy and feminine Frenchness. The recording is not too close, but still captures plenty of detail. Well-chosen and fabulously executed, what’s not to love?" (Dominy Clements)

Fanfare Magazine
"...they combine the qualities that I associate with some of the 20th-century’s best duo piano teams: the Labèque sisters’ verve and dynamism, the Kontarsky brothers’ rigor and clarity, and Tal and Groethuysen’s sensitivity." (Paul Orgel)

American Record Guide
"I predict a great future for this duo – they seem to have it all. I would compare them to the young Labeques...” (Harrington)

Diapason CD 
"En-thou-sias-mant"

MUSICA
"Leggerezza, trasparenza, fluidità nel fraseggio e verve ritmica sono in realtà le caratteristiche di tutte le interpretazioni del CD. Anche Scaramouche di Milhaud, tradizionale riserva di caccia di istrionici virtuosi della tastiera, tra le mani delle due sorelle tedesche rivela una dolcezza insospettata, soprattutto nel Modéré centrale. “Leggerezza, trasparenza, fluidità nel fraseggio e verve ritmica sono in realtà le caratteristiche di tutte le interpretazioni del CD..." (Luca Segalla)

MusicWeb international (Recording of the month 4-2013)
I’m most amazed by their unity in quieter moments; the first movement of Ravel’s Rapsodie espagnole is, for me, the highlight of the disc. Oh, the softness of their touch in those first bars; the way, they instantly conjure up such vivid imagery! Only the finest piano duos make you forget altogether that you’re listening to two people, not just in the most technically difficult passages but in the simplest ones too. Another moment especially impressive in this regard is the andante of Poulenc’s sonata for two pianos, in which the lyricism and drama are both given full voice. Really everything here is a delight..." (Brian Reinhart)